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The Chuquatonchee Chapter of the Daughter’s of the American Revolution awarded Emily Pettit and Kiley Smith their Outstanding Work in American History Award. Shown from left are DAR representative Betty Atkinson, Smith, history teacher Anquinto Lewis, Pettit and history teacher Cathy Spencer.

HOUSTON – The Chuquatonchee Chapter of the Daughter’s of the American Revolution has awarded two students its top honor for grades in history at Houston High School.

Emily Pettit and Kiley Smith earned the chapter’s Outstanding Work in American History Award with the highest grades among juniors this spring.

“We are always so proud to recognize those students who excel in history,” said Betty Atkinson, DAR American History chairman. “Their grades reflects a lot of hard work and the local chapter of the DAR is always pleased to honor that effort.”

Pettit and Smith are students for American history teachers Cathy Spencer and Anquinto Lewis.

Emily Pettit

Pettit is currently studying history in Houston’s dual enrollment class that gives her college credit.

“History doesn’t change and it can tell us why we are where we are now,” said Pettit. “Our perspective may change, but the things that happened and why they happened don’t change.”

Pettit said anyone who studies history is quick to seek how conflict and war make the most impact on history.

“If you look at World War I, the Spanish American War and the Civil War you see why our country and world are like they are,” said Pettit.

She said her favorite era is the World War I.

“So much changed in the years leading up to World War I,” said Pettit. “It’s what made America a world power.”

Pettit said she plans to attend Mississippi State University and major in Accounting. She is the daughter of Hugh and Dawn Pettit.

Kiley Smith

Her history classes at at Houston High School have taught her why America is the country it is today. She, too, said conflict seem to bring out the best and worst in people, cultures and countries

“Things happen that lead up to war, then you have so much put into these wars and countries either get stronger or weaker,” she explained. “Wars change things so much in just a few years.”

She said World War II is her favorite era.

“In the space of about 20 years we changed so much,” said Smith. “Things happened on both side of the world that changed everyone on Earth.

Smith pointed to the Holocaust, the atomic bomb and men and women from America who went to far away places, did heroic things, then came home changed to raise families.

Smith said she plans to attend Mississippi State University and major in Education with a focus in English. She is the daughter of Robbie and Shannon Smith.

Chuquatonchee DAR

The Chuquatonchee Chapter of the Daughter’s of the American Revolution has chosen the top performing students from Houston High School for more than 10 years.

The DAR, founded in 1890 and headquartered in Washington, D.C., is a non-profit, non-political volunteer women’s service organization dedicated to promoting patriotism, preserving American history and securing America’s future through better education for children.

DAR members volunteer more than 60,000 hours annually to veteran patients, award over $150,000 in scholarships and financial aid each year to students and support schools for the underprivileged with annual donations exceeding $1 million dollars.

As one of the most inclusive genealogical societies in the country, DAR boasts 165,000 members in 3,000 chapters across the United States and internationally. Any woman 18 years or older – regardless of race, religion, or ethnic background – who can prove lineal descent from a patriot of the American Revolution, is eligible for membership.

The Chuquatonchee Chapter, Mississippi State Society, of the Daughter’s of the American Revolution is headquartered in Houston.

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