djr-2019-07-19-news-todd-jordan-arp1

Jordan

TUPELO • When Todd Jordan is sworn in as the newest and youngest Lee County supervisor at the end of the month, he wants to solve several issues facing the county as soon as possible.

A 49-year-old real estate agent, Jordan will be the only new member of the Lee County Board of Supervisors come January. He is a native of Tupelo and is well aware of how the county has changed over the years.

But, one thing he believes to be a staple of the community is the county’s library. When he lived on North Madison Street, he distinctly remembers visiting the county library often. This one of the reasons Jordan is in favor of renovating the facility.

“I’m a proponent of the library,” Jordan, a Republican, told the Daily Journal. “I think we need something. There’s some pretty big figures being tossed around, but if we’re going to have something, we at least need to have something up to code.”

At a recent supervisors meeting, the director of the county’s library presented three different renovations options to the county leaderS, each with a different price tag. The board is waiting for Jordan to be sworn in before deliberating further.

Jordan is in favor of improving the facility, but he wants to see if more people, including city officials, can join the cause instead of the county footing the bill alone. Very early estimates indicate that the county would have to issue bonds to fund the effort, which would likely cause a small tax increase.

“I think the long range plan we’d like to look at just see where we’re going,” he said. “And I don’t know if this will happen in two months, six months or a year, but when you’re talking about asking people to pay for something that 60% may never step foot in, that’s a tough decision to do.”

Like the library, county officials have long debated what to do with the county’s overcrowded jail. Jordan said he doesn’t have a concrete solution, but he does think the county should discuss the issue quickly instead of continuing to push it down the road.

“A couple of years ago, I had to go get fingerprinted to renew my real estate license,” he said. “When I walked into the administrative part, I kind of felt sorry for the people that work in there. I think we need some administrative offices and obviously more beds. When you get so overcrowded, it becomes unsafe for the workers and the inmates.”

Jordan could prove to be the deciding vote on the two issues, and he believes the county should always think toward the future.

“You just want to see your kids grow up having things that you didn’t,” he said. “You get to make those decisions based on the future, and I think that’s important.”

taylor.vance@journalinc.com

Twitter: @taylor_vance28

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